Digital Humanities Teaching Project

Hello Readers,

I am currently getting ready for a year of teaching. I have been working on the presentation for a lecture on ‘The Globe in 1250: Late Medieval maps of the world’ for my internship unit for first semester, entitled ‘Old Worlds, New Empires’, a global history survey unit spanning the years 1250-1788. In addition, I am also working on a teaching project for my internship.

Rather than repeat myself, I will direct you to the question I asked on academia.edu, which goes as follows.

I am currently working on a teaching project on the topic of ‘Promoting undergraduate use of online resources in Medieval and Early Modern Studies’. I have discovered some excellent stuff on digitalhumanities.org and DH quarterly, but it strikes me as a topic best developed by asking the academic community, medievalists, humanists and digital humanists alike. My question is this. Do you know of a) any useful articles on this topic (especially on medieval studies in particular) b) online resources that you think might be particularly useful for encouraging undergraduate engagement in DH or c) strategies for assessment and teaching that would promote undergraduate interaction with online humanities resources in medieval and early modern studies? I’m looking for as diverse a range of opinions as possible.

I encourage you to join in the conversation. Some very interesting comments and examples have been proposed thus far, and I would love to hear from as many people as possible. I explained my motivations as follows on academia.edu:

Many, many institutions are doing a great job of creating [digital humanities] tools, but I think that we are all still learning how best to make use of them for teaching purposes. Rather than using these tools ad hoc, i’d really like to see pedagogy that is steeped in digital humanities. That takes time and experimentation, and I that’s why i’m particularly interested. I’m only just starting out in teaching really, and i’d like to incorporate digital tools from the start. It seems from the number of people who have followed this question (and the number of those who are graduate students) that others share my interest.

Have something to add to the conversation? Please feel free to either comment on this post or on academia.edu. I should stress once again that I am looking for input from others’ experience that will inform my teaching and curriculum development. If you choose to comment on here, please let me know if you’re willing to let me re-post your comments on academia.edu for the benefit of those following over there.

Best Wishes and Happy Teaching,

James

 

 

 

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